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This page was last modified on 18 May 2016, at 10:15.

Condition

The term eczema may describe a range of persistent skin conditions, including dryness and recurring skin rashes that are characterized by one or more of these symptoms: redness, skin edema (swelling), itching and dryness, crusting, flaking, blistering, cracking, oozing, or bleeding.

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Individual at risk

Donor / recipient

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Guidance at RECRUITMENT for adult volunteer donor and maternal donor (cord blood donation)

Acceptable if not requiring systemic (i.e. tablet) therapy (including oral steroids and other immunosuppressive agents). Topical steroids (i.e. creams appied to the skin) are acceptable. Check if given ultraviolet (PUVA) therapy, which may otherwise require donor deferral.

Guidance at CT/WORK-UP

Acceptable if not requiring systemic (i.e. tablet) therapy (including oral steroids and other immunosuppressive agents). Topical steroids (i.e. creams appied to the skin) are acceptable. Check harvest sites are not involved (inside elbows, back of hips). Check if given ultraviolet (PUVA) therapy.

Inform transplant centre if the donor has eczema.

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Justification for guidance

There is a risk of transfer of atopic conditions to the recipient, although only a few cases have been described in the literature, and not eczema specifically. G-CSF may theoretically cause a flare of any inflammatory condition, including eczema, although this is likely to return to normal following donation.

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References

Hallstrand TS, Sprenger JD, Agosti JM, Longton GM, Witherspoon RP, Henderson WR, Jr. Long-term acquisition of allergen-specific IgE and asthma following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation from allergic donors. Blood 2004; 104(10): 3086-90.

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